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Adam Bosworth, BEA's chief architect and senior vice president, advanced development, in his eWorld 2004 keynote today, demonstrated a future BEA technology concept code-named Alchemy, designed to enable mobile workers to be as productive offline as they are online. A fundamental component of BEA's Liquid Computing vision, Alchemy is projected to be the industry's first universal client platform designed and optimized for service-oriented architectures (SOAs) and the realities of occasionally connected mobile users. Alchemy supports the productivity pillar of BEA's Liquid Computing vision of a fluid enterprise that can help change IT responsiveness from "months to minutes." Liquid Computing builds upon a service-oriented architecture foundation, with the objective of aligning every enterprise interaction with real-time business goals to help companies become service... (more)

Software AG Named "Gold Sponsor" of SOA World Conference & Expo 2009 East

SYS-CON Events announced today that Software AG was named "Gold Sponsor" of the upcoming SOA World Conference & Expo 2009 East. The 15th International SOA World Conference will take place June 22-23, 2009, in New York City. Software AG is the world's largest independent provider of Business Infrastructure Software. The company's 4,000 global enterprise customers achieve business results faster by modernizing, integrating and automating their IT systems and processes. As a result, they rapidly build measurable business value and meet changing business demands. Based on Software AG solutions, organizations are able to liberate and govern their data, systems, applications, processes and services - achieving new levels of business flexibility. Software AG's leading product portfolio includes solutions for high performance data management, developing and modernizing appli... (more)

Why SOA Needs Cloud Computing - Part 1

SOA in the Cloud It's Thursday morning, you're the CEO of a large, publicly traded company, and you just called your executives into the conference room for the exciting news. The board of directors has approved the acquisition of a key competitor, and you're looking for a call-to-action to get everyone planning for the next steps. You talk to the sales executives about the integration of both sales forces in three months time, and they are excited about the new prospects. You talk to the HR director who is ready to address the change they need to make in two months. You speak to the buildings and maintenance director who can have everyone moved that needs to be moved in three months. Your heart is filled with pride. However, when you ask the CIO about changing the core business processes to drive the combined companies, the response is much less enthusiastic. "Not... (more)

Clustering the BEA WebLogic Application

Mission-critical Web-based applications ­ customer self-service, distribution channel and supply chain management, online trading and banking ­ must be deployed on a cluster of servers in order to provide scalability and high availability. Scalability means that servers can be dynamically added or removed as needed to meet user demand, and that the overall load of requests is distributed among the servers so that resources remain fully utilized. High availability means that there is no "single point of failure" in either the system or the application, and that requests automatically failover from nonworking components to working components. Ideally, clustering should be transparent to applications: externally, the cluster should present a "single-system image." In addition to simplifying the task of application development, this allows off-the-shelf components to be... (more)

Visual Café Enterprise Edition For WebLogic

When I started working with Java, I mentioned my move to a colleague of mine, a Microsoft devotee. He wasn't willing to move to the Java platform until supporting integrated development environments (IDEs) were as powerful and easy to use as Visual Basic. Although at the time nothing in the Java world was as simple or configurable as Visual Basic, I bit the Java bullet - and the bullet tasted like VisualCafé. Originally from Symantec Corp. (www.symantec.com) but now owned by an independent company created by Warburg, Pincus and BEA Systems, VisualCafé was the closest Java IDE in the industry that could compare to VB, and it remains on the bleeding edge of support for new Java technologies. This month in EJB Home I'll discuss what to look for in an IDE that supports EJB, as well as the support for Enterprise JavaBeans development that has been integrated into the V... (more)

Cowabunga! - WebLogic Helps BEA and Its Partners Surf Into the 21st Century

With its annual Executive Symposium held in New York City this month, BEA Systems, Inc., has reinforced its claim to be one of the world's leading application infrastructure software companies by announcing that it has won a contract with the Discovery Information Systems division of AstraZeneca - one of the world's leading pharmaceutical companies. BEA WebLogic Server was selected to provide AstraZeneca with an open platform for application delivery. BEA doubtless hoped that this latest deal was in delegates' minds as they attended the Symposium, presented by BEA in cooperation with the Harvard Business Review. Its very title - "Staying Power" - seemed calculated to underline the San Jose-based company's remarkable corporate resilience. One of the speakers at the Symposium, from BEA partner Accenture, was David Hill, Global Managing Partner for Accenture. Hill's pres... (more)

Shared Sessions Using EJBs

The Problem: We have a J2EE application where clients with the same userid need to share the session data that is maintained on the server side. In addition, clients aren't just Web clients, but applets and applications as well. How should we implement that? The Solution: This is a typical problem when writing J2EE applications, since the J2EE APIs don't provide an out-of-the-box solution for this. The Servlet API typically used with Web clients provides nice ways to manipulate the client's session and the data related to it, but doesn't offer a direct means of sharing the session data between clients (for security reasons). It's also somewhat limited to Web clients only. Enterprise Java Beans (EJBs), on the other hand, could be used to implement this quite easily, since they work with any type of Java clients. It may be a bit heavyweight, but programmatically it's q... (more)

BEA WebLogic Portal Technical Overview

With the release of WebLogic Portal 4.0 in October 2001, BEA introduced a major update to its portal functionality and added significant new features. In this article, we'll give you a technical overview of the new product, and provide a glimpse of some of the new functionality you'll find in it. Although the portal market is still very fragmented and not well-defined, and the concept of a portal remains vague, we can say that a portal comprises a number of concrete and useful paradigms: the user interface paradigm, the content and data aggregation paradigm, the application development paradigm, and the enterprise architecture paradigm. On the user interface side, the model has been firmly established by consumer portals such as MyYahoo! present content and information to the user in a compact way on a page and let the user customize the look and feel of that page. T... (more)

Why Choose a CMP Architecture?

Last month, I talked about the power of CMP entity EJBs and provided a number of scenarios where leveraging the CMP model would be preferable to developing stateless session EJBs that use JDBC or JDO. This month, I'll talk about the reasons for using a CMP architecture over a BMP one in entity EJBs. Reasons to Use BMP with Entity EJBs First, let's talk about the scenarios where BMP is appropriate for use in an entity EJB system. The biggest reason to use BMP over CMP is because what you want to accomplish cannot be done through BMP: Fields are accessed through stored procedures: If you work in an enterprise that regulates data access through stored procedures, a CMP engine won't know how to interact with the appropriate stored procedures. The entity EJB life cycle is very strict and it's likely that any stored procedure access to a database doesn't follow this life c... (more)

Getting Started: Becoming a BEA Certified Developer on WebLogic Server 6.0

Are you looking for something to differentiate yourself from your peers in this tighter job market? BEA WebLogic Server Certification may be for you. It provides employers, or potential employers, with additional evidence that you're qualified for developing solutions on the BEA WebLogic Server platform. Are you looking to advance in your professional career, or get a raise? BEA WebLogic Server Certification may be the thing for you! Many employers offer salary increases or bonuses is for attaining technical certifications. One such certification program is jCert, created by BEA Systems, Hewlett-Packard, IBM, Oracle, Sun Microsystems, and Sybase. The BEA Certified Developer Test qualifies as a jCert Initiative test. More information on this can be found at www.jcert.org. There are many reasons to become a BEA Certified Developer, but the best is to prove to yoursel... (more)

Health Monitoring and Notification of Servers in a Cluster

What would happen if you had a stand-alone server, say an Admin Server having just a managed server? Or what if the Admin server itself becomes unresponsive. How would someone be notified when they became unresponsive? ".....This is bad. Why did the server hang? And on top of this, why did we come to know about this so late?" As Bob heard his boss say this, he knew what was about to come next. He would be told to open a case with WebLogic support, who would help them do a postmortem of why and how the server stopped responding in production. Probably he would need to go beyond it this time, and figure out a way to automatically check server status. I've often come across situations in which customers want to monitor the health of the servers running in a cluster. Better still, to get notifications should a condition arise. If you're running in a cluster, which of co... (more)

CloudEXPO Stories
With more than 30 Kubernetes solutions in the marketplace, it's tempting to think Kubernetes and the vendor ecosystem has solved the problem of operationalizing containers at scale or of automatically managing the elasticity of the underlying infrastructure that these solutions need to be truly scalable. Far from it. There are at least six major pain points that companies experience when they try to deploy and run Kubernetes in their complex environments. In this presentation, the speaker will detail these pain points and explain how cloud can address them.
The deluge of IoT sensor data collected from connected devices and the powerful AI required to make that data actionable are giving rise to a hybrid ecosystem in which cloud, on-prem and edge processes become interweaved. Attendees will learn how emerging composable infrastructure solutions deliver the adaptive architecture needed to manage this new data reality. Machine learning algorithms can better anticipate data storms and automate resources to support surges, including fully scalable GPU-centric compute for the most data-intensive applications. Hyperconverged systems already in place can be revitalized with vendor-agnostic, PCIe-deployed, disaggregated approach to composable, maximizing the value of previous investments.
When building large, cloud-based applications that operate at a high scale, it's important to maintain a high availability and resilience to failures. In order to do that, you must be tolerant of failures, even in light of failures in other areas of your application. "Fly two mistakes high" is an old adage in the radio control airplane hobby. It means, fly high enough so that if you make a mistake, you can continue flying with room to still make mistakes. In his session at 18th Cloud Expo, Lee Atchison, Principal Cloud Architect and Advocate at New Relic, discussed how this same philosophy can be applied to highly scaled applications, and can dramatically increase your resilience to failure.
Machine learning has taken residence at our cities' cores and now we can finally have "smart cities." Cities are a collection of buildings made to provide the structure and safety necessary for people to function, create and survive. Buildings are a pool of ever-changing performance data from large automated systems such as heating and cooling to the people that live and work within them. Through machine learning, buildings can optimize performance, reduce costs, and improve occupant comfort by sharing information within the building and with outside city infrastructure via real time shared cloud capabilities.
As Cybric's Chief Technology Officer, Mike D. Kail is responsible for the strategic vision and technical direction of the platform. Prior to founding Cybric, Mike was Yahoo's CIO and SVP of Infrastructure, where he led the IT and Data Center functions for the company. He has more than 24 years of IT Operations experience with a focus on highly-scalable architectures.