Click here to close now.

Welcome!

Weblogic Authors: Elizabeth White, Michael Meiner, Michael Bushong, Avi Rosenthal

News Feed Item

Software - BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India, China) Industry Guide

NEW YORK, Jan. 14, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue:

Software - BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India, China) Industry Guide

http://www.reportlinker.com/p0191844/Software---BRIC-Brazil-Russia-India...

Software - BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India, China) Industry Guide is an essential resource for top-level data and analysis covering the BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India, China) Software industry. The report includes easily comparable data on market value, volume, segmentation and market share, plus full five year market forecasts. It examines future problems, innovations and potential growth areas within the market.

Scope of the Report

* Contains an executive summary and data on value, volume and segmentation

* Provides textual analysis of the industry's prospects, competitive landscape and profiles of the leading companies

* Incorporates in-depth five forces competitive environment analysis and scorecards

* Compares data from Brazil, Russia, India, and China, alongside individual chapters on each country. .

* Includes a five-year forecast of the industry

Highlights

Brazil, Russian Federation, India and China (BRIC) are the emerging and fast growing countries within the software industry and had a total market value of $25.2 billion in 2011. India was the fastest growing country with a CAGR of 19.3% over the 2007-11 period.

Within the software industry, China is the leading country among the BRIC nations with market revenues of $14.6 billion in 2011.

China is expected to lead the software industry in the BRIC nations with a value of $28.5 billion in 2016, followed by Russia, India, Brazil with expected values of $6.3, $6.1 and $5.1 billion, respectively.


Why you should buy this report

* Spot future trends and developments



* Inform your business decisions



* Add weight to presentations and marketing materials



* Save time carrying out entry-level research



Market Definition

The computer software market consists of systems and application software. Systems software comprises operating systems, network and database management, and other systems software. Application software comprises general business productivity and home use applications, cross-industry and vertical market applications, and other application software. Market value figures are assessed at manufacturer selling price (MSP), based on revenues from software sales and licenses. Any currency conversions used in the creation of this report have been calculated using constant 2011 annual average exchange rates.





TABLE OF CONTENTS


Introduction 11


What is this report about? 11


Who is the target reader? 11


How to use this report 11


Definitions 11


BRIC Software Industry Outlook 12


Software in Brazil 15


Market Overview 15


Market Data 16


Market Segmentation 17


Market outlook 19


Five forces analysis 20


Macroeconomic indicators 26


Software in China 28


Market Overview 28


Market Data 29


Market Segmentation 30


Market outlook 32


Five forces analysis 33


Macroeconomic indicators 39


Software in India 41


Market Overview 41


Market Data 42


Market Segmentation 43


Market outlook 45


Five forces analysis 46


Macroeconomic indicators 52


Software in Russia 54


Market Overview 54


Market Data 55


Market Segmentation 56


Market outlook 58


Five forces analysis 59


Macroeconomic indicators 65


Company Profiles 67


Leading companies 67


Appendix 97


Methodology 97



LIST OF TABLES

Table 1: BRIC software industry, revenue($bn), 2007-16 11


Table 2: BRIC software industry, revenue($bn), 2007-11 12


Table 3: BRIC software industry, revenue($bn), 2011-16 13


Table 4: Brazil software market value: $ billion, 2007–11 15


Table 5: Brazil software market category segmentation: $ billion, 2011 16


Table 6: Brazil software market geography segmentation: $ billion, 2011 17


Table 7: Brazil software market value forecast: $ billion, 2011–16 18


Table 8: Brazil size of population (million), 2007–11 25


Table 9: Brazil gdp (constant 2000 prices, $ billion), 2007–11 25


Table 10: Brazil gdp (current prices, $ billion), 2007–11 25


Table 11: Brazil inflation, 2007–11 26


Table 12: Brazil consumer price index (absolute), 2007–11 26


Table 13: Brazil exchange rate, 2007–11 26


Table 14: China software market value: $ billion, 2007–11 28


Table 15: China software market category segmentation: $ billion, 2011 29


Table 16: China software market geography segmentation: $ billion, 2011 30


Table 17: China software market value forecast: $ billion, 2011–16 31


Table 18: China size of population (million), 2007–11 38


Table 19: China gdp (constant 2000 prices, $ billion), 2007–11 38


Table 20: China gdp (current prices, $ billion), 2007–11 38


Table 21: China inflation, 2007–11 39


Table 22: China consumer price index (absolute), 2007–11 39


Table 23: China exchange rate, 2007–11 39


Table 24: India software market value: $ billion, 2007–11 41


Table 25: India software market category segmentation: $ billion, 2011 42


Table 26: India software market geography segmentation: $ billion, 2011 43


Table 27: India software market value forecast: $ billion, 2011–16 44


Table 28: India size of population (million), 2007–11 51


Table 29: India gdp (constant 2000 prices, $ billion), 2007–11 51


Table 30: India gdp (current prices, $ billion), 2007–11 51


Table 31: India inflation, 2007–11 52


Table 32: India consumer price index (absolute), 2007–11 52


Table 33: India exchange rate, 2007–11 52


Table 34: Russia software market value: $ billion, 2007–11 54


Table 35: Russia software market category segmentation: $ billion, 2011 55


Table 36: Russia software market geography segmentation: $ billion, 2011 56


Table 37: Russia software market value forecast: $ billion, 2011–16 57


Table 38: Russia size of population (million), 2007–11 64


Table 39: Russia gdp (constant 2000 prices, $ billion), 2007–11 64


Table 40: Russia gdp (current prices, $ billion), 2007–11 64


Table 41: Russia inflation, 2007–11 65


Table 42: Russia consumer price index (absolute), 2007–11 65


Table 43: Russia exchange rate, 2007–11 65


Table 44: International Business Machines Corporation: key facts 66


Table 45: International Business Machines Corporation: key financials ($) 67


Table 46: International Business Machines Corporation: key financial ratios 68


Table 47: Microsoft Corporation: key facts 70


Table 48: Microsoft Corporation: key financials ($) 71


Table 49: Microsoft Corporation: key financial ratios 71


Table 50: Oracle Corporation: key facts 73


Table 51: Oracle Corporation: key financials ($) 74


Table 52: Oracle Corporation: key financial ratios 75


Table 53: TOTVS S.A.: key facts 77


Table 54: TOTVS S.A.: key financials ($) 78


Table 55: TOTVS S.A.: key financials (BRL) 78


Table 56: TOTVS S.A.: key financial ratios 79


Table 57: Hewlett-Packard Company: key facts 81


Table 58: Hewlett-Packard Company: key financials ($) 83


Table 59: Hewlett-Packard Company: key financial ratios 83


Table 60: Infosys Limited: key facts 85


Table 61: Infosys Limited: key financials ($) 86


Table 62: Infosys Limited: key financial ratios 87


Table 63: Tata Consultancy Services Limited: key facts 89


Table 64: Tata Consultancy Services Limited: key financials ($) 90


Table 65: Tata Consultancy Services Limited: key financials (Rs.) 91


Table 66: Tata Consultancy Services Limited: key financial ratios 91


Table 67: SAP AG: key facts 93


Table 68: SAP AG: key financials ($) 94


Table 69: SAP AG: key financials (€) 94


Table 70: SAP AG: key financial ratios 94



LIST OF FIGURES

Figure 1: Brazil software market value: $ billion, 2007–11 13


Figure 2: Brazil software market category segmentation: % share, by value, 2011 14


Figure 3: Brazil software market geography segmentation: % share, by value, 2011 15


Figure 4: Brazil software market value forecast: $ billion, 2011–16 16


Figure 5: Forces driving competition in the software market in Brazil, 2011 17


Figure 6: Drivers of buyer power in the software market in Brazil, 2011 18


Figure 7: Drivers of supplier power in the software market in Brazil, 2011 19


Figure 8: Factors influencing the likelihood of new entrants in the software market in Brazil, 2011 20


Figure 9: Factors influencing the threat of substitutes in the software market in Brazil, 2011 21


Figure 10: Drivers of degree of rivalry in the software market in Brazil, 2011 22


Figure 11: China software market value: $ billion, 2007–11 26


Figure 12: China software market category segmentation: % share, by value, 2011 27


Figure 13: China software market geography segmentation: % share, by value, 2011 28


Figure 14: China software market value forecast: $ billion, 2011–16 29


Figure 15: Forces driving competition in the software market in China, 2011 30


Figure 16: Drivers of buyer power in the software market in China, 2011 31


Figure 17: Drivers of supplier power in the software market in China, 2011 32


Figure 18: Factors influencing the likelihood of new entrants in the software market in China, 2011 33


Figure 19: Factors influencing the threat of substitutes in the software market in China, 2011 34


Figure 20: Drivers of degree of rivalry in the software market in China, 2011 35


Figure 21: India software market value: $ billion, 2007–11 39


Figure 22: India software market category segmentation: % share, by value, 2011 40


Figure 23: India software market geography segmentation: % share, by value, 2011 41


Figure 24: India software market value forecast: $ billion, 2011–16 42


Figure 25: Forces driving competition in the software market in India, 2011 43


Figure 26: Drivers of buyer power in the software market in India, 2011 44


Figure 27: Drivers of supplier power in the software market in India, 2011 45


Figure 28: Factors influencing the likelihood of new entrants in the software market in India, 2011 46


Figure 29: Factors influencing the threat of substitutes in the software market in India, 2011 47


Figure 30: Drivers of degree of rivalry in the software market in India, 2011 48


Figure 31: Russia software market value: $ billion, 2007–11 52


Figure 32: Russia software market category segmentation: % share, by value, 2011 53


Figure 33: Russia software market geography segmentation: % share, by value, 2011 54


Figure 34: Russia software market value forecast: $ billion, 2011–16 55


Figure 35: Forces driving competition in the software market in Russia, 2011 56


Figure 36: Drivers of buyer power in the software market in Russia, 2011 57


Figure 37: Drivers of supplier power in the software market in Russia, 2011 58


Figure 38: Factors influencing the likelihood of new entrants in the software market in Russia, 2011 59


Figure 39: Factors influencing the threat of substitutes in the software market in Russia, 2011 60


Figure 40: Drivers of degree of rivalry in the software market in Russia, 2011 61


Figure 41: International Business Machines Corporation: revenues & profitability 66


Figure 42: International Business Machines Corporation: assets & liabilities 67


Figure 43: Microsoft Corporation: revenues & profitability 70


Figure 44: Microsoft Corporation: assets & liabilities 70


Figure 45: Oracle Corporation: revenues & profitability 73


Figure 46: Oracle Corporation: assets & liabilities 74


Figure 47: TOTVS S.A.: revenues & profitability 77


Figure 48: TOTVS S.A.: assets & liabilities 78


Figure 49: Hewlett-Packard Company: revenues & profitability 82


Figure 50: Hewlett-Packard Company: assets & liabilities 82


Figure 51: International Business Machines Corporation: revenues & profitability 85


Figure 52: International Business Machines Corporation: assets & liabilities 86


Figure 53: Microsoft Corporation: revenues & profitability 89


Figure 54: Microsoft Corporation: assets & liabilities 89


Figure 55: Oracle Corporation: revenues & profitability 92


Figure 56: Oracle Corporation: assets & liabilities 93


Figure 57: International Business Machines Corporation: revenues & profitability 96


Figure 58: International Business Machines Corporation: assets & liabilities 97


Figure 59: Infosys Limited: revenues & profitability 100


Figure 60: Infosys Limited: assets & liabilities 101


Figure 61: Microsoft Corporation: revenues & profitability 104


Figure 62: Microsoft Corporation: assets & liabilities 104


Figure 63: Tata Consultancy Services Limited: revenues & profitability 107


Figure 64: Tata Consultancy Services Limited: assets & liabilities 108


Figure 65: International Business Machines Corporation: revenues & profitability 111


Figure 66: International Business Machines Corporation: assets & liabilities 112


Figure 67: Microsoft Corporation: revenues & profitability 115


Figure 68: Microsoft Corporation: assets & liabilities 115


Figure 69: Oracle Corporation: revenues & profitability 118


Figure 70: Oracle Corporation: assets & liabilities 119


Figure 71: SAP AG: revenues & profitability 122


Figure 72: SAP AG: assets & liabilities 122


To order this report:
Software_and_Consulting Industry:
Software - BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India, China) Industry Guide

__________________________


Nicolas Bombourg
Reportlinker
Email: [email protected]
US: (805)652-2626
Intl: +1 805-652-2626

 

 

SOURCE Reportlinker

More Stories By PR Newswire

Copyright © 2007 PR Newswire. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of PRNewswire content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of PRNewswire. PRNewswire shall not be liable for any errors or delays in the content, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon.

@ThingsExpo Stories
Docker is an excellent platform for organizations interested in running microservices. It offers portability and consistency between development and production environments, quick provisioning times, and a simple way to isolate services. In his session at DevOps Summit at 16th Cloud Expo, Shannon Williams, co-founder of Rancher Labs, will walk through these and other benefits of using Docker to run microservices, and provide an overview of RancherOS, a minimalist distribution of Linux designed expressly to run Docker. He will also discuss Rancher, an orchestration and service discovery platf...
The explosion of connected devices / sensors is creating an ever-expanding set of new and valuable data. In parallel the emerging capability of Big Data technologies to store, access, analyze, and react to this data is producing changes in business models under the umbrella of the Internet of Things (IoT). In particular within the Insurance industry, IoT appears positioned to enable deep changes by altering relationships between insurers, distributors, and the insured. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Michael Sick, a Senior Manager and Big Data Architect within Ernst and Young's Financial Servi...
PubNub on Monday has announced that it is partnering with IBM to bring its sophisticated real-time data streaming and messaging capabilities to Bluemix, IBM’s cloud development platform. “Today’s app and connected devices require an always-on connection, but building a secure, scalable solution from the ground up is time consuming, resource intensive, and error-prone,” said Todd Greene, CEO of PubNub. “PubNub enables web, mobile and IoT developers building apps on IBM Bluemix to quickly add scalable realtime functionality with minimal effort and cost.”
The Internet of Things (IoT) is rapidly in the process of breaking from its heretofore relatively obscure enterprise applications (such as plant floor control and supply chain management) and going mainstream into the consumer space. More and more creative folks are interconnecting everyday products such as household items, mobile devices, appliances and cars, and unleashing new and imaginative scenarios. We are seeing a lot of excitement around applications in home automation, personal fitness, and in-car entertainment and this excitement will bleed into other areas. On the commercial side, m...
Sensor-enabled things are becoming more commonplace, precursors to a larger and more complex framework that most consider the ultimate promise of the IoT: things connecting, interacting, sharing, storing, and over time perhaps learning and predicting based on habits, behaviors, location, preferences, purchases and more. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Tom Wesselman, Director of Communications Ecosystem Architecture at Plantronics, will examine the still nascent IoT as it is coalescing, including what it is today, what it might ultimately be, the role of wearable tech, and technology gaps stil...
Every innovation or invention was originally a daydream. You like to imagine a “what-if” scenario. And with all the attention being paid to the so-called Internet of Things (IoT) you don’t have to stretch the imagination too much to see how this may impact commercial and homeowners insurance. We’re beyond the point of accepting this as a leap of faith. The groundwork is laid. Now it’s just a matter of time. We can thank the inventors of smart thermostats for developing a practical business application that everyone can relate to. Gone are the salad days of smart home apps, the early chalkb...
In the consumer IoT, everything is new, and the IT world of bits and bytes holds sway. But industrial and commercial realms encompass operational technology (OT) that has been around for 25 or 50 years. This grittier, pre-IP, more hands-on world has much to gain from Industrial IoT (IIoT) applications and principles. But adding sensors and wireless connectivity won’t work in environments that demand unwavering reliability and performance. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Ron Sege, CEO of Echelon, will discuss how as enterprise IT embraces other IoT-related technology trends, enterprises with i...
When it comes to the Internet of Things, hooking up will get you only so far. If you want customers to commit, you need to go beyond simply connecting products. You need to use the devices themselves to transform how you engage with every customer and how you manage the entire product lifecycle. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Sean Lorenz, Technical Product Manager for Xively at LogMeIn, will show how “product relationship management” can help you leverage your connected devices and the data they generate about customer usage and product performance to deliver extremely compelling and reliabl...
The Internet of Things (IoT) is causing data centers to become radically decentralized and atomized within a new paradigm known as “fog computing.” To support IoT applications, such as connected cars and smart grids, data centers' core functions will be decentralized out to the network's edges and endpoints (aka “fogs”). As this trend takes hold, Big Data analytics platforms will focus on high-volume log analysis (aka “logs”) and rely heavily on cognitive-computing algorithms (aka “cogs”) to make sense of it all.
With several hundred implementations of IoT-enabled solutions in the past 12 months alone, this session will focus on experience over the art of the possible. Many can only imagine the most advanced telematics platform ever deployed, supporting millions of customers, producing tens of thousands events or GBs per trip, and hundreds of TBs per month. With the ability to support a billion sensor events per second, over 30PB of warm data for analytics, and hundreds of PBs for an data analytics archive, in his session at @ThingsExpo, Jim Kaskade, Vice President and General Manager, Big Data & Ana...
One of the biggest impacts of the Internet of Things is and will continue to be on data; specifically data volume, management and usage. Companies are scrambling to adapt to this new and unpredictable data reality with legacy infrastructure that cannot handle the speed and volume of data. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Don DeLoach, CEO and president of Infobright, will discuss how companies need to rethink their data infrastructure to participate in the IoT, including: Data storage: Understanding the kinds of data: structured, unstructured, big/small? Analytics: What kinds and how responsiv...
The Workspace-as-a-Service (WaaS) market will grow to $6.4B by 2018. In his session at 16th Cloud Expo, Seth Bostock, CEO of IndependenceIT, will begin by walking the audience through the evolution of Workspace as-a-Service, where it is now vs. where it going. To look beyond the desktop we must understand exactly what WaaS is, who the users are, and where it is going in the future. IT departments, ISVs and service providers must look to workflow and automation capabilities to adapt to growing demand and the rapidly changing workspace model.
Since 2008 and for the first time in history, more than half of humans live in urban areas, urging cities to become “smart.” Today, cities can leverage the wide availability of smartphones combined with new technologies such as Beacons or NFC to connect their urban furniture and environment to create citizen-first services that improve transportation, way-finding and information delivery. In her session at @ThingsExpo, Laetitia Gazel-Anthoine, CEO of Connecthings, will focus on successful use cases.
Sensor-enabled things are becoming more commonplace, precursors to a larger and more complex framework that most consider the ultimate promise of the IoT: things connecting, interacting, sharing, storing, and over time perhaps learning and predicting based on habits, behaviors, location, preferences, purchases and more. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Tom Wesselman, Director of Communications Ecosystem Architecture at Plantronics, will examine the still nascent IoT as it is coalescing, including what it is today, what it might ultimately be, the role of wearable tech, and technology gaps stil...
Almost everyone sees the potential of Internet of Things but how can businesses truly unlock that potential. The key will be in the ability to discover business insight in the midst of an ocean of Big Data generated from billions of embedded devices via Systems of Discover. Businesses will also need to ensure that they can sustain that insight by leveraging the cloud for global reach, scale and elasticity.
The Internet of Things (IoT) promises to evolve the way the world does business; however, understanding how to apply it to your company can be a mystery. Most people struggle with understanding the potential business uses or tend to get caught up in the technology, resulting in solutions that fail to meet even minimum business goals. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Jesse Shiah, CEO / President / Co-Founder of AgilePoint Inc., showed what is needed to leverage the IoT to transform your business. He discussed opportunities and challenges ahead for the IoT from a market and technical point of vie...
IoT is still a vague buzzword for many people. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Mike Kavis, Vice President & Principal Cloud Architect at Cloud Technology Partners, discussed the business value of IoT that goes far beyond the general public's perception that IoT is all about wearables and home consumer services. He also discussed how IoT is perceived by investors and how venture capitalist access this space. Other topics discussed were barriers to success, what is new, what is old, and what the future may hold. Mike Kavis is Vice President & Principal Cloud Architect at Cloud Technology Pa...
Hadoop as a Service (as offered by handful of niche vendors now) is a cloud computing solution that makes medium and large-scale data processing accessible, easy, fast and inexpensive. In his session at Big Data Expo, Kumar Ramamurthy, Vice President and Chief Technologist, EIM & Big Data, at Virtusa, will discuss how this is achieved by eliminating the operational challenges of running Hadoop, so one can focus on business growth. The fragmented Hadoop distribution world and various PaaS solutions that provide a Hadoop flavor either make choices for customers very flexible in the name of opti...
The true value of the Internet of Things (IoT) lies not just in the data, but through the services that protect the data, perform the analysis and present findings in a usable way. With many IoT elements rooted in traditional IT components, Big Data and IoT isn’t just a play for enterprise. In fact, the IoT presents SMBs with the prospect of launching entirely new activities and exploring innovative areas. CompTIA research identifies several areas where IoT is expected to have the greatest impact.
Advanced Persistent Threats (APTs) are increasing at an unprecedented rate. The threat landscape of today is drastically different than just a few years ago. Attacks are much more organized and sophisticated. They are harder to detect and even harder to anticipate. In the foreseeable future it's going to get a whole lot harder. Everything you know today will change. Keeping up with this changing landscape is already a daunting task. Your organization needs to use the latest tools, methods and expertise to guard against those threats. But will that be enough? In the foreseeable future attacks w...